RC training
R/C Driving Tips
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BASIC DRIVING TRAINING
You cannot make yourself a skilled driver just by running a car at will. Make a course using things like empty cans as pylons.
OVAL COURSE 1
This is the simplest course using two pylons. It looks simple at first sight to drive a car along, but it will require some practice to achieve sharp and rigid turns made with the pylons as vertexes of the curves. Practice both ways, clockwise and counterclockwise, until you can make both rounds in about the same period of time. Figure "8" drill can be also done in the same track.

OVAL COURSE 2
Have two or three pairs of pylons forming gates and run your car through them as accurately as possible. You will find it much harder than the oval course No.1. For the first period of time, arrange the pylons at a wide space, narrow them gradually, then at last put them at a space of one meter. Practice in both rotations, clockwise and counterclockwise.

ROAD COURSE
When finishing course No.1 and No.2 you have mastered the basic driving techniques. Now you should proceed to complex courses. Build a road course with the pylons, from basic figure "T" and "L" courses to more complicated circuits, assortment of figure "L" and hairpin curves, high speed curve and slaloms.

CAR STEERS OPPOSITELY?
If you are a novice driver and not sufficiently accustomed to R/C car driving, you may feel as if the car steered oppositely to the transmitter movement when the car runs toward you. To solve this problem, try to imagine you were driving in the R/C car. As you repeat the basic exercise, you will get used to this way of thinking and control the model smoothly.

WHERE TO LOOK WHEN DRIVING
When you drive a car, it is important what you keep your eye on. Suppose the squares described are the field of vision, Put your Point of sight on the forward part of the area of vision with a car placed at the rear. The car moves at a rate of 8.3meters per sec when the hourly speed is 30km/h. With your point of site on the car itself you cannot keep clear of obstacles ahead, because it is to late to notice them; nor can you take corners easily.

Improving your R/C skills on the Track
Operating a radio controlled car in the open is one thing, but running it on a closed track is entirely different. Even though you are not competing, and only practicing, driving on a track will add much to your driving skills. You can also observe techniques used by experienced drivers running highly tuned cars at the track.
1. CORNERING TECHNIQUES
No particular skill is required for driving a car just straight, and the drag speed is limited by the car's own inherent performance capability. However, at curves, your finesse of taking corners affects the result even among cars of the same performance. Especially in speed races, the cornering technique is one of the decisive factors. After becoming accustomed to the car, try to practice smooth, speedy and stable cornering.

"Slow-In and fast-Out" is a golden rule In speed controlling at curves, and "Out-ln-Out" instructs how to steer a car. Briefly, you should control speed in "Slow-In and Fast-Out" manner and steer a car in "Out-ln-Out" way.
    WHAT'S "SLOW-IN AND FAST-OUT"
Decelerating when entering into a curve and picking up the speed after a vertex of the curve is the technique. In the case of entering bends without reducing speed, the car is forced to slow down before finishing comers to lose speed and stability. In the worst cases, the car might spin or run off the course. It also gets the car moving too late to pick up speed. As a result "Slow-In and Fast-Out" is the fastest way to take corner's.

WHAT'S "OUT-IN-OUT"
It is, as illustrated, a way of turning curves from the outside line of a course Into the inside line to which the car will come closest at the vortexes (clipping points) and finishing the cornering approach back to the outside line, thus making the longest possible turning radius. By utilizing the full width of the course, the car will make an easier turn than the actual curve. So the car may be allowed to run through It faster.

SET THE CUPPING POINT AFTER THE VERTEX
As a matter of fact, however, it seems more advantageous to set the clipping point a little after the vertex, because it allows easier latter half cornering and enables the car more powerful acceleration into the straight course, in spite of sharper first half cornering.
    ACCELERATION DURING THE LATTER HALF OF A CURVE IS IMPORTANT
Both "Slow-In and Fast-out" and "Out-in-Out" techniques are established from attaching more importance to velocity in the latter half of cornering than the first half. This has something to do with the acceleration of a car; that is a car increasing speed faster than other cars at the latter half can take the lead in the successive straight track, provided the cars should have the same pickup and maximum speed capability. This principle is true anywhere except in a very wide road where you are not required to reduce the speed at all.
     THE LAST CURVE IS THE MOST IMPORTANT IN A CHAIN
The last curve is the most important In continuous curves. In successive bends of a road, steer your car so that it will make the easiest turn at the last curve. Then you will be able to speed it up as soon as getting into the straight course.
    CONSIDER COMPLEX CURVES AS ONE
Consider complex curves as one integrated compound. In the case of complex curves with different radii, you can manage to get through by considering them as one complex curve and making a cornering passage.
     TAKE THE INSIDE LINE ON GENTLE CURVES
Although the "slow-In, fast-out" and the "out-in-out" rules are basic for cornering. If the curve Is gentle enough, there is little, or no need to reduce speed. Naturally, it is advantageous to use the inside line throughout the curve, when possible
     OBSERVE THE ENTIRE TRACK LAYOUT
Although several tips are offered when describing Individual curves, a track Is a succession of straights and curves, it is therefore Important to observe the entire layout and select a smooth running line for completing a lap. Repeat practice laps, trying various routes to find the ideal line. Shortening your lap times during trials is one of radio control's greatest enjoyments.
     WHEN PERFORMANCE GETS BETTER, THE DRIVING LINE SHOULD BE ALTERED
When your car's top speed becomes faster by using a higher performance motor, etc. more deceleration will be required when entering corners. Not only the speed, but the handling characteristics, tire grip etc. will influence the driving line a car should take.
Not just steering alone, but combining with throttle control, various cornering techniques can be obtained. Practice and master this for much faster and smoother cornering.
     FOUR WHEEL DRIFT
This technique is achieved by over steering white deceleration during the early stage of cornering. As the rear wheels start to slide outward and the nose heads towards the inside of the corner, neutralize the steering and add power. The car will take the comer with all wheels sliding. This technique is suitable for rear wheel drive and 4WD race care.
     TACKING-1N
This technique is unique to front wheel drive care. Enter a curve straight, then cut power and steer around the curve at the same time The car will change direction quickly. Straighten out and accelerate going through the corner.
     COUNTER OR OPPOSITE LOCK STEERING
The term means to steer the wheels against the turn of a comer. If a car enters the corner too fast, the rear wheels could start to skid, resulting in a spin. To stop this, steer into the direction of the skid. This technique is used to prevent the car from spinning and is not for enhancing cornering speed.
     WEIGHT LOAD SHIFT ACCORDING TO POWER APPLIED
When running at a steady speed, the load is divided between the car's front and rear wheels in a fixed ratio. During deceleration, more of a load is put on the front wheel because of inertia, resulting in sharper steering response. Opposite of this is acceleration,

where more of a load is put on the rear wheels, producing a slower steering response. Both the four-wheel drift and tack-in use this weight load shift to obtain desired cornering results.
A race is run with many cars at the same time. If you want to become familiar with racing, the best way is to hold practice sessions with your friends as a group. It is important to feel the difference between driving a car by yourself and competition racing. You'll notice that
the track seems somewhat narrower with all those care and it becomes difficult to steer the car on the line you desire. Experience is what counts to get your car ahead of other.
    START
The result of a race sometimes depends upon the start. However, a quick start is not always advantageous. Accidents are most liable to occur between the start and the first corner because participating cars are running close to one another. Decide how you should start according to the characteristics of your car, course layout, etc.
    TAKE AND HOLD THE INSIDE LINE DURING CORNERING
When competing with your rivals during cornering, take and keep the inside line for maintaining the lead. It is difficult for you to beat your opponent in the corner by trying to pass him on the inside line because both cars are running about the same speed. If your car can manage a higher maximum speed than the others, only then is passing on the outside line possible. Trying to take the inside line too early can lead to over-running the corner resulting in a loss of time and running space for your car. While you're at the edge of the track, your rival can easily pass you on the inside. In order to avoid this, stick to the inside, forcing him to delay his acceleration. Tacking and holding the inside line in the corner is a golden rule for taking the lead at corners. Confrontation between cars during cornering are the most exciting moments during a race, but be sure to avoid the selfish type of running that can cause a collision and damage that will spoil the overall race for everyone.
     HOW TO PASS OTHERS
There are various places in which you can try to pass another car. A straight Is the safest place to do so. It is dangerous to start passing a car when you are following close behind it. When you judge it is possible to pass, steer your car a little as soon as possible and attempt to pass. You may pass on either side, wherever there is more room. If the space on each side is about the same, it is advisable to go inside to make the next corner to negotiate. Passing on a corner is dangerous as compared with passing on a straight. If the driver of the car you are going to pass to not skillful In control, your car Is liable to be Involved in its spinning. To make passing easier, it is advisable to go inside the rival's car and pass it after turning the corner. It is very difficult to pass it on the outside of the corner even if your car is much faster.
     IF THE CAR LOSES STABILITY
If your car has hit another car and lost its stability, reduce the speed by turning down the speed control switch. If you try to restore stability by steering, the car might be further disturbed. Start acceleration again only after the car has slowed down and is stable.

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